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Kubernetes, CoreOS, and many lines of Python later.

Several months after my last post, and lots of code hacking, I can rebuild CoreOS-based bare-metal Kubernetes cluster in roughly 20 minutes. It only took ~1300 lines of Python following Kelsey Hightower’s Kubernetes the Hard Way instructions.

Large refactors require large changes in code.

It had been several months since I was away from my machines at home, and in that time, CoreOS changed their bare-metal installation procedures quite a bit. To the point where it almost seemed like an after-thought that folks would run CoreOS anywhere outside of GCE/AWS/Azure.

No more powerline networking in this house.

I finally got around to wiring Cat6 to my desktop machines at home, and ripped out those powerline network adapters. I ran a test if iperf between my desktop and my router before and after the upgrade to see how things fared.

What I read today:

I’d like to (try to) keep a running tab of all the technical, and non-technical, bits of information I pick up day to day. I’m hoping it might provide some insight into what I’m interested at the time, or little tidbits of helpful information I find laying around the web.

Kubernetes, the slow way.

It all started when I began hearing about this container thing outside of work. I’ve been a Google SRE going on 6 years, but knowing that the way we do containers internally on Borg is probably not how the rest of the world does reliable, scalable, infrastructure.

A simplified way to securely move all the bits.

A while back, I wrote a post about setting up an L2TP/IPSec VPN on my home firewall/router. It required two daemons and a bunch of configuration that had hard coded IP addresses.

LACP, VLANs, always stay connected.

I was bored last weekend, so I configured a two-port LACP bonded trunk from my FreeBSD-running NAS connected to my HP Procurve switch. Why? I could? I had all these spare Ethernet ports on my NAS, and they seemed bored.

Get off my lawn, DMZ edition.

I recently changed Internet providers from Comcast Business to Verizon Fios connection. As part of the Fios package, are TV Set Top Boxes (STB) which use coax for Video, and Internet via MOCA for the guide data.

I wrote my own network latency monitoring agent in Go

For a while I had used Smokeping to generate pretty graphs of network latency between various hosts on my network. The downside with Smokeping was always getting it working. Did I configure my webserver just right?

A brand new blog for 2016

A new year gave me an itch to scratch. For years I had been running a pretty standard setup when it came to blogging. Linode Apache Wordpress MySQL It was as vanilla a setup as one can get, running on a $10/month Linode instance out of their datacenter in Atlanta.